- What is the project about?    A group of local volunteers are exploring the possibility of bringing art to the iconic grain silos and elevator located at Pier 86 on the Seattle waterfront north of Myrtle Edwards Park. A steering committee has been formed called the Friends of Art on Pier 86 (FAP86).  Their charter is to determine the feasibility of adding art to the existing structures without compromising the functionality of the facility.

- What is the overall timing?    The study began in April 28, 2015 – and is funded to go through April 28, 2016.

- Who is going to select the art?    Feasibility Study will examine that issue, but will NOT select the art; that will be after the Feasibility Study has set up the parameters and the process.

- Who will produce the art?    Feasibility Study will explore multiple ways for calling artists.  At this time there are no assumptions and the art call could be for local, national or international artists.  The whole point of the Feasibility Study is to determine the pros and cons of all approaches if the project is possible and approved.

- Who will maintain the art?    The maintenance and upkeep will all be elements the Feasibility Study will address.  Since the Study is not about any specific art, it will explore best practices for maintenance overall and provide some guidelines independent of the final art selection.
Where else has this been done successfully?     There are some excellent and original examples where this has been done with amazing effects.  Some of these have been accomplished with paint, vinyl, plants or video projection,  all with tremendous effects:  see working active ports at Granville Island, Vancouver; Quebec City, Quebec; and Northam, Australia;  and defunct structures at San Francisco Pier 92; Buffalo, NY; and Omaha, Neb. 

- What is the proposed cost for the Feasibility Study?     The Feasibility Study is funded by the Seattle Department of Neighborhoods.  The awarded budget is $25,000. The Port of Seattle is providing in-kind support. 

- What is the impact to the environment?     The Feasibility Study will closely examine the surrounding environment for impacts and careful guidelines for any proposed art types.

- Who will own the art?     To be determined. Art would be installed on a structure owned by the Port of Seattle.

- Who owns the grain elevators?    The grain elevators are a working facility owned by the Port of Seattle and leased to a private company that operates it.

- How will neighborhoods be involved &  informed?    Members of the Steering Committee from surrounding neighborhood councils are charged with giving monthly updates.  Check our website or join our mailing list for updates.

- How will the community know about the Feasibility Study findings?     There will be three public meetings to discuss the major findings of the Feasibility Study in September, October, and December/January. Plus those findings will be posted on our website & Facebook pages. 

- Can I know more about the elevators?     The Terminal 86 Grain Elevator is one of the most prominent landmarks on the waterfront, north of Seattle. Cargo ships have been parked two even three at a time waiting to fill up–signs of a strong harvest and heavy international demand for U.S. commodities. The terminal occupies 17 acres (7 hectares).

  • LENGTH:  425 feet (130 meters) / 1,400 feet (427 meters) with dolphins
  • HEIGHT: 20 feet (6 meters)
  • APRON WIDTH: 20 feet (6 meters)

- How can I get involved?     Check our website or join our mailing list to see presentation schedules and meetings times.